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Now, your newest acting work was in a New Zealand series called Mataku.

Mataku is a New Zealand series based on Maori myths and legends. The translation of the word Mataku is ĎThe Quivering.í And itís like a modern day horror series. So I played a character on that and it was great. I got to die! I got electrocuted. [laughs] And itís a very different genre to anything Iíd done before. And very New Zealand, very Kiwi.

From the descriptions Iíve read, it sounds like a New Zealand version of The Twilight Zone.

Very much. Exactly.

The episode you were in is called The Photo and you played a character named Stephanie. Was she the main character?

No, I was a supporting character. But I got a death scene! [laughs]

How many death scenes have you had? I can think of The Photo and the Motherhood episode of Xena.

[laughs] Itís bizarre because it was only today that I actually saw, when they played clips from that episode (Motherhood), when I lost my head. Iíd never seen any of that. So Iíve had that death scene and probably the Mataku death scene. And thatís about it really. But itís one of the fun things to do. Dying on film.

Turning to you non-acting work, you spent a lot of time behind the scenes on The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

The Lion, the Witch and the WardrobeÖhonestly itís an extraordinary movie. I mean I donít even know if itís going to be successful at the moment because when you work so closely with something, itís really hard to know, to judge it. And it was like the longest film shoot that Iíve ever done. It was like 5 months, even though I wasnít acting in it, it was the longest period where I had to go to work all day, every day. And I was in the special effects department, which was so novel because basically they are the cowboysÖand they do all the stuff from blowing things up to making all the snow. Most all the snow youíll see onscreen is man made. So just being part of that and actually learning about how other people make the picturesÖacting is very different, you know what I mean? You go stick your chin up and you have your wardrobe, you have your costume, you have this great set, but you never see how it originates. Whereas this was actually being like one of the originators, so itís very rewarding in a completely different kind of way. But itís actually I think sometimes more satisfying because youíre there from the beginning to the end and youíre actually physically making it. You know what I mean? Youíre actually MAKING it. Rather than just turning up and being in it. Yeah, it was wicked.

part 4